Monday Numbers #19

Monday Numbers #19

This week’s numbers in the real world:  speed limits.  This is the type of speed limit I like the least – those that are “strictly enforced.” I prefer those that are “enforced only on Mondays.”

In all seriousness, of course we have to have speed limits or we would have race-car-driver-wannabes on the road, and of course I don’t want to speed on Monday or any other day of the week.

In 1908, the maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph. In 2013, the highest speed limit in the United States is at 85 mph on a stretch of Texas highway between Austin and San Antonio.

If you spend time crossing state lines, you might want to check out this map that tells you how fast you can go:

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_limits_in_the_United_States

Back in the “olden days,” you didn’t have to be driving a car to get a speeding ticket.  Ulysses S. Grant was ticketed for speeding in his horse and buggy down the streets of Washington D.C. The police officer didn’t recognize him.  There was no facebook back then for one to post selfies, so it wasn’t unusual for people not to recognize others.

Speaking of horses, 40% of the people that fall off a horse are drunk.

Here is me (a selfie!) on a horse in the “semi-olden-days”: 1992.  I was not speeding and I was not drunk.  I was on one of those horse rides where horses are attached to a merry-go-round type thing.  That’s the only kind of horse I ride.

But back to speed limits. . . speed limits are one way of keeping our speeds in check.  But sometimes a picture, and not a number, is what is needed to tell people to slow down.  As in these signs:

This week, as you travel down life’s highway, watch out for cows, tractors, and Ulysses S. Grant; and as always, make this week count.

Update: Serendipity — Today, Popular Mechanics posted an article about the 10 Tips to Avoid Speeding Tickets. www.popularmechanics.com/cars/news/vintage-speed/10-tips-to-avoid-speeding-tickets-16106949?click=pp

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